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Visit Himba peoplein Opuwo, Namibia

#1of 4 things to doin Opuwo

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Women from Himba tribes are depicted on pictures as a cultural symbol of Namibia.
How to visit Himba people in Opuwo
Wandering people Himba is the most popular ethnic group of Namibia. About 50 000 people inhabit mostly northwestern part of the country.

Himba people are animists and believe in spirits of ancestors and nature. Women take care of themselves very thoroughly, but without using any water (pretty expensive resource), but they regularly cover their body with special cream made of ground Hematite, milk fat, ash and Commiphora wildii tar as a fragrance component

Women greased their hair with clay, Opuwo
Photo: Women greased their hair with clay

Himba men normally go hunting as women do mundane things and bring up children.

How to do?

1. One of Himba settlements kraal (encircled cone-shaped huts made from clay and dung) is placed in outskirts of Kamanjab village where you can get by car or take a charter plane.

Himba mud hut, Opuwo

2. Visitors of Himba settlements can come here only with a guide - you can hire one in Opuwo or in Kamanjab. Besides you have to pay for entrance to a tribal leader ($16). Some foods (corn flower, vegetable oil, etc.) are also welcomed here.

3. You can stay overnight in one of 29 lodges and camp spots in Kunene Region.

Tips and hints

Taking photos and videos have to agreed with a tribal leader.
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Guest22 May 2018
Photo credit © bertoguide | flickr